Business Ad – Marketoloji http://marketoloji.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 18:55:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://marketoloji.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1-150x150.png Business Ad – Marketoloji http://marketoloji.com/ 32 32 Marshall named athletic director https://marketoloji.com/marshall-named-athletic-director/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 18:18:07 +0000 https://marketoloji.com/marshall-named-athletic-director/ History links VESTAL, NY – Binghamton University President Harvey Stenger is pleased to announce the appointment of Eugene Marshall Jr.. as Athletic Director, effective January 5, 2023. Marshall has 38 years of experience in intercollegiate athletics, most recently serving as director of athletics at Hampton University in Virginia, where he has held […]]]>

VESTAL, NY – Binghamton University President Harvey Stenger is pleased to announce the appointment of Eugene Marshall Jr.. as Athletic Director, effective January 5, 2023.

Marshall has 38 years of experience in intercollegiate athletics, most recently serving as director of athletics at Hampton University in Virginia, where he has held that position since 2014. At Hampton, he was responsible for the intercollegiate athletics as well as club, intramural, and recreational sports. Activities. He has experience in developing strategic and financial plans, compliance, and partnering with other divisions to improve student life.

He has also held athletic director or assistant director positions at the Pratt Institute, College of Staten Island, United States Military Academy at West Point, Ramapo College of New Jersey, Iona College, and Queens. Middle School.

“The level of competition Binghamton student-athletes bring to the America East Conference and the academic accolades they achieve are points of pride for Binghamton University,” Stenger said. “Gene brings with him a wealth of experience that can help us pursue the excellence we have seen on the courts and playing fields, in the pool and in the classroom.”

Marshall earned his bachelor’s degree in business administration and a master’s degree in athletic leadership from Northeastern University, where he played Division I basketball. He also worked as an administrator for IBM for seven years before entering the world of intercollegiate athletics.

In his role as Director of Athletics at Binghamton, Marshall will be responsible for all aspects of the University’s 21 intercollegiate athletics programs, ensuring student-athletes can achieve their maximum athletic, academic and social potential. . It will provide leadership that fosters a commitment to student success, diversity, equity and inclusion; implement initiatives that promote the physical and emotional well-being of students; oversee recruitment and development activities; oversee NCAA and East America compliance, financial operations, and facility operations; Build and maintain relationships with campus and community partners.

“Binghamton University has a strong intercollegiate athletics staff and a comprehensive program,” Marshall said. “I’m excited to join campus as the next DA and look forward to being part of the Binghamton area community.”

]]>
Mercedes Benz to pay $5.5 million to settle Arizona diesel ad case https://marketoloji.com/mercedes-benz-to-pay-5-5-million-to-settle-arizona-diesel-ad-case/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 22:05:00 +0000 https://marketoloji.com/mercedes-benz-to-pay-5-5-million-to-settle-arizona-diesel-ad-case/ WASHINGTON, Nov 18 (Reuters) – German automaker Mercedes Benz and automotive supplier Robert Bosch LLC (BOSH.NS) have agreed to pay a total of around $6 million to resolve a lawsuit over diesel ads , the US state of Arizona announced on Friday. . Under the proposed settlement, Mercedes Benz will pay $2.8 million in consumer […]]]>

WASHINGTON, Nov 18 (Reuters) – German automaker Mercedes Benz and automotive supplier Robert Bosch LLC (BOSH.NS) have agreed to pay a total of around $6 million to resolve a lawsuit over diesel ads , the US state of Arizona announced on Friday. .

Under the proposed settlement, Mercedes Benz will pay $2.8 million in consumer restitution, and each eligible Arizona consumer will receive up to $625 per vehicle, Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich said.

“Arizona demands truth in advertising to help consumers make the most informed decisions for themselves,” he said.

Mercedes Benz, which has denied the allegations and made no admissions, will also pay $2.7 million in penalties, and Robert Bosch LLC, which also said it did not admit liability or wrongdoing. , will pay $525,000 in penalties, Arizona said.

“With the settlement, the company takes another step toward resolving various diesel lawsuits…and avoids further litigation costs and lengthy legal proceedings,” Mercedes Benz said in a statement.

Bosch has confirmed the regulations for the engine control units of certain Mercedes diesel vehicles.

In 2020, Mercedes Benz agreed to pay $2.2 billion to resolve a U.S. government diesel emissions fraud investigation and the claims of 250,000 U.S. vehicle owners.

The settlement included an $875 million civil penalty imposed under the Clean Air Act and $546 million to repair polluting vehicles and offset excessive emissions.

A Justice Department investigation into the Mercedes emissions issue remains open and a number of U.S. states have ongoing environmental and consumer protection investigations, the company said in its annual report in March.

Mercedes Benz, then known as Daimler AG, agreed in 2020 to pay 250,000 owners up to $3,290 each to have polluting vehicles repaired.

Diesel vehicles have come under intense scrutiny in the US since Volkswagen AG (VOWG_p.DE) admitted in 2015 to installing secret cheat software on 580,000 US vehicles.

VW has paid more than $30 billion to solve investigations and buy back vehicles.

Earlier this month, Bosch agreed to pay $25 million to resolve the California investigation into its role in the diesel emissions scandals at Volkswagen and Fiat Chrysler Automobiles.

In August, Fiat Chrysler’s U.S. business, now part of Stellantis (STLA.MI), was convicted after pleading guilty to criminal conspiracy and paying nearly $300 million to solve a multi-year drug fraud investigation. US Department of Justice Diesel Emissions.

Reporting by David Shepardson; Editing by Mark Porter, Emelia Sithole-Matarise and Alexander Smith

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

]]>
Before dropping out of the rankings, Yale Law School took a hit on key metric https://marketoloji.com/before-dropping-out-of-the-rankings-yale-law-school-took-a-hit-on-key-metric/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 10:02:30 +0000 https://marketoloji.com/before-dropping-out-of-the-rankings-yale-law-school-took-a-hit-on-key-metric/ Campus Amid free speech controversies, school’s ‘peer review’ score pushed it below the competition Yale University in 2018 / Getty Images Aaron Sibarium • November 17, 2022 5:00 am Yale Law School Dean Heather Gerken explains the school’s decision to withdraw from the US News and World Report ranking law schools as altruistic, arguing that […]]]>

Amid free speech controversies, school’s ‘peer review’ score pushed it below the competition

Yale University in 2018 / Getty Images

Aaron Sibarium • November 17, 2022 5:00 am

Yale Law School Dean Heather Gerken explains the school’s decision to withdraw from the US News and World Report ranking law schools as altruistic, arguing that “deeply flawed” rankings “deter programs that support careers in the public interest.”

But a closer look at those rankings suggests that Yale, which over the past year has been the site of a fierce free speech debate and has drawn unwanted attention for its response to controversies on campus, may have had a selfish reason to jump ship. According US News and World Reportof the published methodology, raising questions about how long it would continue to hold the top spot.

The “peer review” score is a measure of how deans and tenured professors across the country rate the quality of a law school on a scale of 1 to 5. Representing 25% of the overall ranking of each faculty, this measurement is the most important factor in US News and World Report law school rankings – and one of the reasons Yale consistently lands at the top of them.

For many years, the law school’s peer review score hovered between 4.8 and 4.9, which meant it generally matched or exceeded scores from Harvard and Stanford. But in March 2022 – amid free speech controversies, including the administration’s abuse and intimidation of a sophomore law student, that thrust the top-ranked school into the spotlight nationals – Yale’s peer review score fell to 4.6, its lowest in more than a decade.

While the drop didn’t dislodge Yale from its number one position overall, it did put the school behind Harvard and Stanford in reputation rankings, a sign that the law school’s perch was more precarious than never seemed there before. Further peer-review score successes could have pushed Yale into second or third place for the first time since US News and World Report began ranking law schools, smashing a major source of its prestige.

Hours after Yale’s announcement, Harvard Law said it would also withdraw from the rankings, a move it said had been in the works for “several months.” The school saw a slight drop in its peer review score, from 4.8 in 2021 to 4.7 in 2022.

Yale Law School did not respond to a request for comment.

In recent months, Gerken has struggled to fend off a series of public relations disasters related to the political climate on campus and the administration’s response to it.

Between September and October, 14 federal judges, including the 5th Circuit’s James Ho and the 11th Circuit’s Elizabeth Branch, said they would no longer hire Yale Law School clerks, citing free speech concerns. and intellectual diversity. They pointed to a September 2021 incident in which administrators pressured sophomore law student Trent Colbert to apologize for using the term “traphouse” in an email, as well an incident in early March in which hundreds of students disrupted a bipartisan panel on civil society. freedoms.

The day school boycott prompted Yale Law to issue a statement affirming its “commitment to the free and unfettered exchange of ideas,” which outlined a number of steps the law school was taking to protect the freedom of expression – a tacit indication that the administrators, including Gerken, are aware that they have a problem on their hands.

Gerken’s statement about the school’s decision to drop the ranking did not address the drop in its peer review score. Instead, she lambasted a “poorly designed” system that “squarely stands in the way of progress”, announcing that “the filing process undermines fundamental commitments of the legal profession”. As a result, she said, “we will no longer participate.”

]]>
Musk’s latest Twitter move can only send ad revenue plummeting https://marketoloji.com/musks-latest-twitter-move-can-only-send-ad-revenue-plummeting/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 22:19:19 +0000 https://marketoloji.com/musks-latest-twitter-move-can-only-send-ad-revenue-plummeting/ Comment this story Comment Another day, another sign that Elon Musk appears to be deliberately steering Twitter Inc. into bankruptcy. The unstable billionaire fired a large number of the company’s contractors without warning, according to CNBC, or some 4,400 contractors out of 5,500, the Platformer tech newsletter reported over the weekend. Many of these people […]]]>

Comment

Another day, another sign that Elon Musk appears to be deliberately steering Twitter Inc. into bankruptcy. The unstable billionaire fired a large number of the company’s contractors without warning, according to CNBC, or some 4,400 contractors out of 5,500, the Platformer tech newsletter reported over the weekend. Many of these people were content moderators.

Concerns about content moderation have been at the heart of why many of the site’s advertisers, such as General Motors Co. and Pfizer Inc., have suspended business with Twitter, taking a wait-and-see approach. This latest development gives advertisers another reason to stay away longer, draining Twitter of much-needed capital. Ads contribute about 90% of Twitter’s revenue.

Without a sufficient number of content moderators, there is a greater chance that hate speech, harassment, misinformation, and spam will thrive on the site. This is a bigger problem for Twitter than for sites like Google or Facebook, where ads are based on search results or more specific targeting. On Twitter, advertisers want to create positive brand awareness, and that’s going to get a lot harder.

Social platforms use artificial intelligence systems to flag bullying, child nudity and other toxic content, but they still need humans as a safety net to distinguish, for example, what’s a joke and what’s what is bullying, or what is art and what is obscene. Often faced with the mental trauma of regularly seeing the worst possible images and epithets the internet has to offer, these people are the unsung heroes of social media.

Generally speaking, AI systems are unreliable for moderating social media posts, according to a 2020 report by the Translatlantic Working Group, a project of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania. Facebook’s own AI is estimated to remove just 2% of viewed content that violates hate speech rules, according to an internal memo published by The Wall Street Journal last year. Facebook said the prevalence of this content is decreasing. Its parent company Meta Platforms Inc. employs about 15,000 people as content moderators.

The dismissal of the contractors will not be covered by Musk’s plans to establish a “content moderators council”, which will deal with high-profile issues such as whether to allow Donald Trump back on the platform. . Much more content on Twitter will now be left to the machines, potentially undoing the platform’s good work of weeding out misinformation and fake foreign accounts over the past two years.

This is sure to further damage Twitter’s reputation in the eyes of advertisers, who have been warned that Twitter is now a “high risk” platform. GroupM, a major media agency that buys advertising on behalf of brands like Nestlé SA and Ford Motor Co., released a “risk reassessment” of Twitter dated Nov. 11, citing Twitter’s “increasing toxicity” and the turmoil of executive resignations, according to a document reviewed by Bloomberg Opinion. The document was also reported by media news site Digiday.

GroupM’s document says that to address its concerns, Twitter must demonstrate its “commitment to effective content moderation” and reduce incidents of toxic content and hate speech. But Musk did the opposite.

Just as Twitter needed streamlining, Musk overdid it in his brutal gutting of the company’s infrastructure, as if tearing down the foundations of a house in need of redecoration and risking it to collapse. ‘collapse.

The world’s richest man is desperate to recoup his $44 billion Twitter purchase. But advertisers scoff at the company’s effectiveness with Musk. They just don’t want their ads to be next to spam and hate speech. It’s hard to see ad dollars returning to Twitter anytime soon, no matter how hard Musk might try to prop things up with his other companies. This will make it more difficult to keep Twitter solvent in the long term.

More from Bloomberg Opinion:

• Twitter is destroying the musky aura that Tesla needs: Liam Denning

• We may be watching Twitter implode in real time: Parmy Olson

• Musk’s massive firing is another sign of Twitter chaos: Mark Gongloff

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Editorial Board or of Bloomberg LP and its owners.

Parmy Olson is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist covering technology. A former journalist for the Wall Street Journal and Forbes, she is the author of “We Are Anonymous”.

More stories like this are available at bloomberg.com/opinion

]]>
Advertising giant Omnicom, parent company of St. Louis-based FleishmanHillard, advises clients to halt advertising spending on Twitter https://marketoloji.com/advertising-giant-omnicom-parent-company-of-st-louis-based-fleishmanhillard-advises-clients-to-halt-advertising-spending-on-twitter/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 03:03:00 +0000 https://marketoloji.com/advertising-giant-omnicom-parent-company-of-st-louis-based-fleishmanhillard-advises-clients-to-halt-advertising-spending-on-twitter/ Advertising and marketing conglomerate Omnicom Group Inc., parent of St. Louis-based FleishmanHillard, has recommended that customers suspend spending on Twitter in the short term, according to an internal memo seen by Reuters. Omnicom serves more than 5,000 customers in 70 countries, including McDonald’s Corp. and Apple. The memo didn’t mention the clients by name, and […]]]>

Advertising and marketing conglomerate Omnicom Group Inc., parent of St. Louis-based FleishmanHillard, has recommended that customers suspend spending on Twitter in the short term, according to an internal memo seen by Reuters.

Omnicom serves more than 5,000 customers in 70 countries, including McDonald’s Corp. and Apple.

The memo didn’t mention the clients by name, and it’s unclear whether any have suspended Twitter’s ad spending.

The move, first reported by tech news site The Verge, underscores growing skepticism among agencies and brands about the microblogging site’s future since Elon Musk’s $44 billion takeover. .

The Tesla CEO has accused civil rights groups lobbying Twitter advertisers of boycotting the service until Musk clarifies how he would control misinformation and hate speech on the service for a “massive” revenue cut. “.

People also read…

  • Reports: Former Mizzou basketball player Jed Frost kills his wife in Dallas
  • Missouri Voters Approve Recreational Marijuana Legalization
  • Teenager killed by Amtrak train was a hard worker with a dry sense of humor, family says
  • Media Views: Sportscaster Jay Randolph Jr., 53, is diagnosed with terminal illness
  • As MLB rules change, star shortstops hit free agency. Attractive? The Cardinals have a short answer.
  • Cardinals catch market for Molina replacement, know they won’t ‘fill Yadi’s shoes’
  • Cardinals Hall of Famer Matt Holliday returns to team as bench coach of Oliver Marmol
  • Cardinals acquire infielder Jose Fermin from Cleveland for cash, update roster
  • Could Yadier Molina’s Cardinals heir be the Astros’ World Series no-hitter catcher?
  • New businesses push Augusta to become the Napa Valley of the Midwest
  • St. Louis judge cites circuit attorney’s ‘mismanagement’, grants police request
  • The Cardinals and Cubs are planning payroll increases. When will NL Central’s competitiveness also increase?
  • Schmitt defeats Valentine in U.S. Senate race from Missouri
  • Blast from the past (Holliday) and jolt for the future (Blake) round out Cardinals staff
  • Here’s what you need to know about recreational marijuana in Missouri

“Twitter’s ability to maintain its previous level of brand safety and efficiency measures appears to be hampered in the immediate term,” according to the memo.

“While OMG believes this is unlikely to result in a significantly higher risk environment for advertisers, the risk of being associated with harmful content may increase and as such should be considered. when deciding to use the platform.”

Ad sales accounted for more than 90% of Twitter’s revenue in the second quarter.

Last month, US automaker General Motors Co. announced that it had temporarily halted paid advertising on Twitter.

]]>
Elon Musk took over a struggling Twitter and quickly made it worse https://marketoloji.com/elon-musk-took-over-a-struggling-twitter-and-quickly-made-it-worse/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 17:25:42 +0000 https://marketoloji.com/elon-musk-took-over-a-struggling-twitter-and-quickly-made-it-worse/ Twitter profile page belonging to Elon Musk seen on an Apple iPhone mobile phone. Nurphoto | Nurphoto | Getty Images When Elon Musk said last week that Twitter experienced a “massive drop in revenue” under his recent tutelage, he blamed the drop on “activist groups pressuring advertisers”. There was some merit to his claim. A […]]]>

Twitter profile page belonging to Elon Musk seen on an Apple iPhone mobile phone.

Nurphoto | Nurphoto | Getty Images

When Elon Musk said last week that Twitter experienced a “massive drop in revenue” under his recent tutelage, he blamed the drop on “activist groups pressuring advertisers”.

There was some merit to his claim. A group of civil rights leaders had sent a letter to the CEOs of major companies, including Anheuser-Busch, Apple, Coca-Cola and Disney, urging them to tell Musk about their concerns about brand safety on the site. The group would later ask those companies to suspend advertising spending on Twitter following what its executives saw as an increase in racist messages and hate speech.

While Musk may be right to attribute some of the drop in revenue to pressure from activists, at least some of the blame lies with him. The new owner of Twitter, the richest person in the world, recently tweeted a conspiracy theory linked to the attack on Paul Pelosi, husband of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and made a series of crude and sophomoric jokes , some of which were quickly deleted.

Companies don’t want to tie their brands to this type of behavior and content, said Rachel Tipograph, CEO of ad tech firm MikMak.

“Advertisers worry about brand safety, and that’s really what it’s all about,” Tipograph said. “Advertisers are not currently seeking association with events currently unfolding on Twitter.”

Companies such as General Engines and Volkswagen suspended spending on Twitter after Musk’s arrival, while advertising titan Interpublic Group urged clients to do the same. The boycott poses a significant problem for the social media service, which derives 90% of its sales from advertising.

Compared to larger rivals Facebook and Google, Twitter has never managed to develop an online advertising business commensurate with the scale of its influence in popular culture and society in general. Twitter has lost money in six of the eight years since its IPO. Its revenue in 2021 reached $5 billion, while Facebook generated sales of $118 billion and Google’s parent company Alphabet recorded $257 billion in revenue.

Twitter’s second-quarter revenue declined from a year earlier.

“In my humble opinion, to use a very technical term, their business sucks and they need a radical transformation,” said Len Sherman, assistant professor of business at Columbia Business School.

It’s a company that Musk paid $44 billion to buy. As part of the deal, he borrowed $13 billion, which he must repay.

For that investment, he secured a company with “very poor targeting capabilities in an ad-based business where it’s critical,” Sherman said. “I laugh a little because I keep getting promoted ads on Twitter in my feed for businesses that would be better directed at 13-year-old girls.”

On Wednesday, Musk is hosting an audio meeting with advertisers on “Twitter Spaces.”

Twitter did not respond to requests for comment.

The YouTube approach

Musk did himself no favors after the acquisition, which closed in late October. In addition to his own dodgy tweets and retweets, he failed to explain what he means by free speech and acceptable content on the platform, and he abruptly fired around 50% of Twitter’s staff almost immediately, raising further questions about content moderation.

Companies usually halt advertising campaigns if they believe they may suffer reputational damage. For example, the companies boycotted Alphabet’s YouTube in 2017, fearing their ads would run alongside videos of extremists.

YouTube executives reacted quickly at the time, allowing third-party verification of content, and hiring more people to remove offensive videos. Advertisers returned and business rebounded quickly.

Musk prefers to take a combative approach to advertisers. Responding to a tweet advising him to name brands boycotting Twitter so his followers can boycott those brands, Musk said “thermonuclear naming and shaming is exactly what will happen if this continues.”

Meanwhile, Musk is taking a convoluted approach to banning users. Twitter has kicked out comedian Kathy Griffin for impersonating Musk on the site, while it temporarily locked comedian Sarah Silverman’s account for a similar offence.

Jeff Seibert, Twitter’s former head of consumer products, called it “a mistake for Elon to be the face of content moderation.” In the past, Twitter has taken a team approach to policy violations.

“If you put one person in charge, I think you start to see random decisions like this that then [cause people to] lose confidence,” Seibert said.

Kathy Griffin attends the ‘A Hell of a Story’ premiere during the 2019 SXSW Conference & Festival at Zach Theater on March 11, 2019 in Austin, Texas.

Tim Mosenfelder | Getty Images Entertainment | Getty Images

Twitter’s advertising business has already started to deteriorate under Musk.

Data from MikMak, whose clients include Colgate, Unilever and General Mills, show a large decline in ad spend on Twitter. From Oct. 1 to Nov. 7, Twitter suffered a 68% drop in media traffic, which refers to the number of times people click on an ad, according to MikMak.

Before that, the numbers had increased. Twitter’s media traffic grew 56.3% from July 1 to September 30 and 326% from April 1 to June 30.

“We were actually seeing an increase in traffic on Twitter,” Tipograph said. “As soon as potential Elon Musk ownership became more imminent, we saw a significant shift in traffic.”

Whatever technology and business improvements are underway will be difficult to sustain as the mass layoffs have eaten away at Twitter’s global marketing team, whose responsibilities include advertising performance reporting and metrics, CNBC reported.

‘Now pay $8’

Musk has focused on subscriptions as the key to reviving Twitter’s finances. He offered an $8 per month plan that allows people to get “verified” and get premium features. The reviews were so fierce that Musk tweeted an image of a t-shirt on Monday, saying “Your feedback is appreciated. Pay $8 now.”

Musk has previously hinted that he wants to turn Twitter into a so-called super app, similar to China’s WeChat, that people can use to talk to friends, watch movies and buy goods.

Still, he will need partners who want to work with him. And his aggressive stance on companies that have paused ads on the site isn’t very appealing as he pursues other partnerships, said Jeanine Turner, a professor in the University’s Communication, Culture and Technology program. of Georgetown.

The “big issue for him, I think, would be confidence,” Turner said. “I don’t see people trusting him with all this information.”

When it comes to advertisers, many brands don’t view Twitter as an essential distribution channel given its less sophisticated ad tracking technology and targeting capabilities. Other opportunities are emerging, such as connected TVs and streaming services, as well as from Amazon growth in online advertising business for retail-focused businesses, Tipograph said.

Jessica González, co-CEO of the nonprofit group Free Press, was unimpressed with Musk’s antics. González was one of the civil rights leaders who spoke with Musk last week, expressing concern over rising hate speech against black and Jewish groups on Twitter. This is the same group that urged advertisers to stop their campaigns.

González said she was ready to give Musk “the benefit of the doubt” when he told the group that Twitter was aligned with them. But between his ensuing rhetoric and his halving of staff, she has serious doubts about whether it’s worth trying to work with him.

When asked if she would take another meeting with Musk to discuss Twitter’s approach to offensive content, she replied, “I don’t know.”

“Only because he made promises at that meeting and then walked back on it two days later,” González said.

Correction: This article has been updated to correct the spelling of Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi’s name.

LOOK: The opportunities on Twitter are gigantic

The opportunities on Twitter are gigantic, says billionaire investor Ron Baron
]]>
10 things Elon Musk should do https://marketoloji.com/10-things-elon-musk-should-do/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://marketoloji.com/10-things-elon-musk-should-do/ Twitter is dying before our eyes, and not from natural causes. Its current owner, Elon Musk, kills it. Ego, impulsiveness and lack of self-discipline are the immediate causes of his decline. The company is alienating advertisers, losing valuable users and attracting the anonymous trolls that Musk supposedly wanted to discourage. Is it too late to […]]]>

Twitter is dying before our eyes, and not from natural causes. Its current owner, Elon Musk, kills it. Ego, impulsiveness and lack of self-discipline are the immediate causes of his decline. The company is alienating advertisers, losing valuable users and attracting the anonymous trolls that Musk supposedly wanted to discourage.

Is it too late to change course? Here are some steps that might help you.

1) Hire a good CEO with relevant business experience.

The new owner of Twitter declared a list of goals. He wants the platform to be accurate, respected, and successful as a business; to support free speech, but not impersonation, fraud or racist abuse. He imagined that these things would all be easy to achieve together. They are not. Clearly enough, the current owner has no idea how to do what he wants to do. Maybe no one could do it. But a good start would be to hire a leadership team that has thought about these and other difficult issues for longer than the past 11 days.

2) Stop insulting customers.

Much of Musk’s motivation for buying Twitter appears to have been his dislike and resentment of Twitter’s most active users, those who wear a blue checkmark. Feelings are feelings, but once an investor buys a company, it’s wise to put feelings aside and think analytically. A common rule of thumb is that 20% of a company’s customers generate 80% of the company’s business. Twitter is probably even more unbalanced than that. As culturally and ideologically irritating as Musk finds his core 20% customer base, he needs it. He didn’t need it before he bet $44 billion on Twitter, but he needs it now. Actions that alienate and scare off core users don’t make business sense.

3) Stop threatening advertisers.

Musk’s big practical idea to save his bankrupt company is to appear to threaten advertisers with retaliation from his political allies if they withdraw their dollars. One of the shortcomings of this strategy is that it warns potential advertisers not to start advertising with Twitter in the first place. Another flaw: the strategy “announce or Congress will punish you” implicitly admits that there is no Company case of advertising on Twitter, that an advertisement on its site is at best another partisan political contribution, at worst a surrender to extortion. Maybe money can be squeezed out of some corporate advertisers this way, for a while, but at the grave risk of marking Twitter forever as a place where dollars are lost, not earned, and stifle any path to advertising growth.

4) Stop amplifying and reinforcing conspiracy theorists.

Musk’s Twitter troubles jumped to the red zone when he quoted in a tweet last week a story from a website known for its farcical fabrications as reporting that Hillary Clinton was dead and pictured in a televised debate. in 2016 by a lookalike. The fantastically told story Musk claimed that Paul Pelosi suffered his recent injuries not from a home invasion and assault, but from a gay encounter gone wrong. . The story was ugly, stupid and vicious. For Musk to share, he warned that Twitter was now under both bigoted and gullible management. Who wants to identify their brand with a social media site that allows itself to become Grand Central for Weirdos?

5) Delete the CEO’s account and hire PR professionals.

Musk follows Donald Trump’s communication strategy: when an idle and possibly offensive impulse crosses your brain, don’t wait, don’t think, don’t take advice, but share it immediately with your millions of followers, except Musk has a real financial stake in the platform, so he finds out it just caused catastrophic damage to his business and his reputation. For a fraction of his investment, experienced PR professionals could communicate what he really needs to say and keep quiet about the things he doesn’t need to say. Effective public relations professionals urge their clients to carefully assess: Why do you say that? Effective public relations professionals help their clients understand that because I was goaded by an account named after cat feces is not a valid answer for the business owner.

6) Don’t fire people until you understand what they are doing to your business.

Last weekend, Musk fired about half of Twitter’s staff on a whim. Now he is trying to rehire some of them. That’s no way to run anything. Take a month. Find out who does what. There’s always fat to get rid of, but if you don’t know where that fat is, you end up self-harming. A CEO is only as good as his information, information often held by others. Listening only to angry emotions from within your own hormonal system is no way to run a candy store, let alone a global business. Understand the business before making cuts. And, of course, you must pay the terminated employees the money you owe them, both for you and for them.

7) Don’t make fun of the competition. Learn about it.

Musk’s antics have prompted hundreds of thousands of Twitter core users to explore alternatives. Musk responded by tweeting a juvenile pun on the Mastodon app (“Masterbatedone”), where many of its users create accounts as a post-Twitter plan B. If you are losing market share to a rival, it is important to understand why. Winners respect their competitors. Bitter, titled grievance is the sound made by losers.

8) Remember Michael Jordan’s advice: “Republicans buy sneakers too.”

Twitter is a politically polarized company. A boutique life can always be made by marketing one way or the other, like, for example, the Black Rifle Coffee brand which markets itself to gun enthusiasts. But large multinationals want to sell in large markets, not in niche markets. If Musk now likes Republicans, great. But write them a campaign donation; don’t put a sign on the door telling democrats to go do their business somewhere else.

9) Stop trolling your users and go back to point #5.

If Twitter dies, Musk’s loudmouth will be about 100% of the reason.

10) Stop telling people they should give you $8 or get lost.

It makes you look like an angry scrapper. Media people are like everyone else in this regard: they will pay for what is useful. If you want their money, don’t beg for it. Win it.

]]>
Biden rallies resistance and urges Americans not to base their votes on inflation and other trivial concerns https://marketoloji.com/biden-rallies-resistance-and-urges-americans-not-to-base-their-votes-on-inflation-and-other-trivial-concerns/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 01:25:00 +0000 https://marketoloji.com/biden-rallies-resistance-and-urges-americans-not-to-base-their-votes-on-inflation-and-other-trivial-concerns/ President Joe Biden gave an unusual speech Wednesday night, urging Americans who don’t support his policies to vote for Democratic candidates anyway to save democracy from “extreme MAGA Republicans” and other “dark forces” threatening to destroy the country. “We have to vote knowing what’s at stake and not just the politics of the day,” Biden […]]]>

President Joe Biden gave an unusual speech Wednesday night, urging Americans who don’t support his policies to vote for Democratic candidates anyway to save democracy from “extreme MAGA Republicans” and other “dark forces” threatening to destroy the country.

“We have to vote knowing what’s at stake and not just the politics of the day,” Biden said at Union Station in Washington, DC, the former site of a huge homeless encampment. “In our bones, we know that democracy is in danger.”

The president has called the upcoming midterm elections a “struggle for the very soul of America,” implicitly berating voters who may be inclined to support Republicans because they worry about the rising cost of life due to runaway inflation under Biden’s watch.

Americans shouldn’t base their votes on petty personal concerns, the president said, because this was a “watershed moment” for the country that demanded that “all Americans, regardless of party,” speak of a “unified voice” in favor of the Democrats. “This is no ordinary year,” he said. “So, I ask you to think long and hard about the moment we find ourselves. »

Biden, 79, began the speech by directly linking the January 6 storming of the Capitol building to last week’s attack on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s husband (D., California), who was bludgeoned with a hammer by a deranged nudist in San Fransisco. “We don’t settle our differences in America with a riot, a mob, a bullet or a hammer, we settle them peacefully [sic] at the battle block [sic]– ballot box,” the president explained.

Both events were “the aftermath of lies” peddled by the “defeated former president” and his allies who constitute the “extreme MAGA element of the Republican Party”, which Biden described as a “minority” but also the “driving force from the GOP.

Questioning the legitimacy of an election was simply “un-American,” said Biden, who warned earlier this year that the 2022 election “would easily be illegitimate” unless Congress approved a proposed radical electoral reform law. (The legislation did not pass.) He went on to tout “record turnout” across the country, which has complicated Democratic efforts to accuse Republicans of voter suppression.

The speech, which would have been co-authored by renowned historian Jon Meacham, was peppered with cliches that probably won’t resonate with the average voter, but might inspire the handful of #Resistance crackpots to tweet passionately: “Democracies are more than a form of government, they are a means of being.” “We must vote knowing who we have been, what we risk becoming.” “It’s not about me. It’s about all of us. It’s about what makes America, America.”

When the president’s speech was announced on Tuesday, it was widely seen as a last-ditch effort to save the Democratic Party from a landslide defeat at the polls. Reports say Biden was motivated to deliver the speech in response to polling data that suggests Republicans are likely to regain control of the House and possibly the Senate as well. He was also concerned that a number of so-called election deniers — including some whom Democrats actively supported in primary elections earlier this year — were on course to win. Once the speech was over, the purpose was less clear.

Those who watched the roughly 30-minute speech could have saved time by watching Joy Reid’s MSNBC interview with failed presidential candidate Hillary Clinton the night before. “I think with all the noise we’ve had this election season, I don’t think people are really able to understand [the threat Republicans pose to democracy]”Clinton said. “But more importantly, I’m not sure they really understand the threats to their way of life.”

This is the most inspiring closing message Democrats can muster at this point. That’s also what they’ve been saying non-stop for nearly two years. And when they lose, after the h20as hysteria subsides, they will inevitably lament that they failed to communicate their message effectively.

]]>
The Big Business of True Crime https://marketoloji.com/the-big-business-of-true-crime/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 01:04:46 +0000 https://marketoloji.com/the-big-business-of-true-crime/ The Netflix show “Dahmer—Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer Story,” a fictionalized account of the serial killer’s life, became the streaming giant’s second most-watched English-language series three weeks after its debut in September. It was helmed by Ryan Murphy, the creator of shows like “Glee” and “American Horror Story,” who produced the show as part of his […]]]>

The Netflix show “Dahmer—Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer Story,” a fictionalized account of the serial killer’s life, became the streaming giant’s second most-watched English-language series three weeks after its debut in September.

It was helmed by Ryan Murphy, the creator of shows like “Glee” and “American Horror Story,” who produced the show as part of his $300 million deal with Netflix.

The show’s success underscores the popularity of true crime, where there is a lot of money to be made. Projects can end up selling for millions of dollars.

In 2020, The New York Times paid $25 million for Serial Productions, the company behind the popular non-fiction podcast “Serial,” whose first season covered the 1999 murder of high school student Hae Min Lee. from Baltimore.

While the true-crime genre has long been popular fodder for the small screen — including documentary series like “Unsolved Mysteries” and the news and documentary show “Dateline” — its footprint has seemed to grow exponentially.

True crime now consists of seemingly countless subgenres, spanning multiple platforms that include network and cable television, streaming services, and podcasts. It’s so popular that there are entire TV channels devoted to true crime stories, like Investigation Discovery and Oxygen, said Ed Hersh, a veteran TV executive, industry consultant focusing on the true crime and adjunct faculty member at Syracuse University.

Hersh said true-crime stories encompass reality shows like “Cops,” crime science show “Forensic Files,” limited documentary series “Making a Murderer,” and scripted dramas, like the “Dahmer” series. from Netflix.

The taxonomy of true crime can also be broken down in other ways – beyond thrillers, there are also “whys”.

“You get into the criminal mind. Why would anyone? We know who did it. Now we want to understand why,” Hersh said.

Then there are true crime stories he calls “howdunits”. Think: The Theranos scandal, where founder Elizabeth Holmes was found guilty of misleading investors about her blood testing company. These cases explore questions such as, “How could anyone get away with this?” Hersh said.

The biggest area of ​​growth, despite the popularity of the fictional “Dahmer,” is in nonfiction, he said.

How Real Crime Series Are Developed

“It’s a long and painstaking process to get something on the air,” said Rob Dorfmann, who founded production company Strong Island Films with his wife, Cindy Dorfmann.

The Dorfmanns have produced true crime films and series for Lifetime Movie Network and Discovery ID, including “My Uncle is the Green River Killer” and “The True Story with Maria Elena Salinas.” Most recently, they produced and directed “Making an Exoneree,” a 2021 documentary that follows Georgetown University students re-examining likely wrongful conviction cases.

Cindy Dorfmann explained that the appeal of true crime to audiences is that “they want to know what drives people to kill people, why murders happen, how people go missing. Everything is grouped in these different packages. There is the mystery of what happened. And then there is also the human psyche – trying to understand. Why would someone do something like that?

Because there’s so much competition in the true crime space, “you need to have a single entry point,” said Rob Dorfmann.

“What’s the unique storyline that you have that no one else has?” he said. “It’s like anything else – you compete in the marketplace.”

Based on his experience, Rob Dorfmann said TV networks like Oxygen or ID could take an order for six episodes of a series if they approved a pitch.

“In the past, they picked up about 10,” he said. “But with the economics and economics of the TV industry, they want to see if it’s doing well first. Sometimes they just take a pilot.

Budgets for these episodes could range from $400,000 to $600,000 per episode.

However, the cost of producing shows and movies can vary depending on whether you use your phone to shoot footage or more sophisticated equipment.

“We own all our equipment…and we own our editing systems. We’ve invested in our business, so we don’t have to pay for these things,” Cindy Dorfmann said. “But it can be quite expensive.”

If you do it right, she said, producing and editing a 90-minute movie can cost upwards of $1 million. “It’s expensive,” she said.

But true-crime documentaries generally cost less than scripted, fictional TV shows or movies, where you have to hire writers, directors, cinematographers and stars, said Hersh, the consultant for the company. ‘industry.

Variety reported in 2017 that FX spends between $3.5 million and $4 million an hour on its dramas, with Ryan Murphy’s “American Crime Story” costing nearly $6 million.

How the True Crime Business Changed

Hersh said advertisers reluctantly accepted the true crime. “Audiences love it and advertisers go where the audience goes,” he said. “Advertisers like to fish where the fish are.”

True crime storytelling has also evolved into an ecosystem, where the popularity of a story in one medium can lead to adaptations in others.

“There’s kind of a pipeline from podcast to TV show and from TV show to podcast,” Hersh said. “Podcasts inspire TV shows and TV shows inspire podcasts.”

For example, Cindy and Rob Dorfmann turned the investigative podcast “Up and Vanished” into a TV show for Oxygen. They also did the reverse, turning an episode they did for the TV adaptation of “Up and Vanished” into what is now their podcast, “Partners in True Crime,” which focuses on the disappearance of residents. of Oklahoma Molly Miller and Colt Haynes. .

“We decided, ‘Oh, we’ve got all this material that you obviously can’t say in an hour. So let’s take a deeper dive. And the only way to really dig in was the podcast,” Cindy Dorfmann said. “The podcast has been very successful. We had over 300,000 downloads in four months.

The podcast includes interviews with family members of Miller and Haynes, including Miller’s cousin, Paula Fielder, who has been trying to resolve his disappearance for nearly a decade.

“What the podcast to me has always been since we met Paula…is what the family is going through and how awful it is and how we can stop it from happening,” Cindy Dorfmann said.

The ethics of true crime

As true crime has grown in popularity, so has the backlash, with critics calling the genre exploitative and pointing out how some stories focus too much on the perpetrators.

Eric Perry – a relative of Errol Lindsey, one of Dahmer’s victims – said on Twitter that Netflix’s “Dahmer” the show was “retraumatizing”.

“I want people to understand that this isn’t just a story or a historical fact, these are the lives of real people. [Lindsey] was someone’s son, someone’s brother, someone’s father, someone’s friend who was taken from [our] lives,” Perry told the Los Angeles Times.

Bethonie Butler, who covers television and pop culture for The Washington Post, said in an interview with NPR that it can be difficult to do true crime stories without re-victimizing the people at the center of those cases.

But in a show like Netflix’s “The Keepers” — which explores the case of Cathy Cesnik, a Baltimore nun who was murdered more than 50 years ago — the focus remains on Cesnik.

“Throughout the episodes, you really feel like Sister Cathy is at the center of it all,” Butler said.

There’s a lot going on in the world. Through it all, Marketplace is there for you.

You rely on Marketplace to break down world events and tell you how it affects you in a factual and accessible way. We count on your financial support to continue to make this possible.

Your donation today fuels the independent journalism you rely on. For just $5/month, you can help maintain Marketplace so we can keep reporting on the things that matter to you.

]]>
Opinion: Democrats just can’t seal the deal with young Americans https://marketoloji.com/opinion-democrats-just-cant-seal-the-deal-with-young-americans/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 20:56:00 +0000 https://marketoloji.com/opinion-democrats-just-cant-seal-the-deal-with-young-americans/ Editor’s note: CNN political commentator Kristen Soltis Anderson is a Republican pollster and strategist and author of “The Selfie Vote: Where Millennials Are Leading America (and How Republicans Can Keep Up.)” The opinions expressed in this commentary are her own. Read more opinion pieces on CNN. CNN — Democrats felt young voters could stay home […]]]>

Editor’s note: CNN political commentator Kristen Soltis Anderson is a Republican pollster and strategist and author of “The Selfie Vote: Where Millennials Are Leading America (and How Republicans Can Keep Up.)” The opinions expressed in this commentary are her own. Read more opinion pieces on CNN.



CNN

Democrats felt young voters could stay home in November and turned to “Dark Brandon” for help in times of trouble.

For those who don’t know – and mine vote suggests that almost everyone reads this – “Dark Brandon” is a meme of President Joe Biden, rendered as an all-powerful hero (or villain, depending on your perspective). It started as a right-wing slogan before Democrats appropriated it to praise the president.

The meme reached the pinnacle of its powers, whatever they might be, when the Democrat group Building Back Together published a 30-second hallucinogenic commercial earlier this month featuring President Biden’s meme, lasers coming out of his eyes and all. The message? Biden is an exciting and successful hero on issues like student loan debt. Or rather, “if you’re not excited about Biden and the Democratic Party, please don’t be.”

I’ve been sounding the alarm for years that Republicans have trouble with young voters and risk losing them for good. That remains the case, as numerous polls show young voters still have a fairly negative view of the GOP.

But even though Millennials and Gen Z Americans tend to lean left on a host of economic and cultural issues such as LGBTQ rights and the size of government, it’s clear that in this mid-election term, the Democrats have not energized the youth vote and may not be. to be able to count on young people as a key element of their coalition.

Voters under 30 aren’t exactly enamored with the way things are going in America these days. Two-thirds of them say the economy is doing badly, according to a CBS News/YouGov poll. And as a result, less than a quarter “strongly approve” of the work Biden is doing. Only 31% say they are “very enthusiastic” about voting midterm, compared to two-thirds of voters aged 65 and over. And only one in six say they pay “great” attention to midterm reviews.

It’s not very unusual. Younger voters typically drop out in greater numbers than older voters as you transition from a big presidential election to a less key midterm. According to CNN exit polls, voters under 30 made up just 13% of all voters in the 2018 midterm elections, down from 17% in the 2020 general election.

However, my own firm’s analysis suggests that voters under 30 could fall to just 10% of the electorate in 2022. – a year in which a historic overall turnout for a mid-term of more than 125 million votes is expected.

While young voters aren’t likely to turn out in large numbers to fuel a “red wave,” it’s not hard to imagine them costing Democrats their majority by staying home.

Democrats haven’t always needed younger voters to win. In fact, young voters were a relatively evenly distributed group of voters for most of the 1990s and 2000s. But midterm in 2006, before Sen. Barack Obama (D-IL) had even announced his candidacy for president, young voters began to bleed from the GOP in large numbers. Exit polls showed voters under 30 split for Democrats by a 22-point margin in House races in that election, which propelled Nancy Pelosi to the presidency for the first time.

Young voters continued to oppose the GOP even during the “red wave” years. The 2010 election, by all accounts a great year for Republicans, saw voters under age 30 still breaks for the Democrats by a 16-point margin. By the time the “blue wave” of 2018 arrived, we were seeing a massive turnout of young voters in the elections they had previously participated in. Plus, those voters broke for the Democrats by an absolutely whopping 35-point margin.

But then Donald Trump lost the presidency and Biden – not necessarily a favorite among young voters – became the leader of the nation and the Democratic Party. Even before he was the Democratic presidential nominee, his polls of young voters still left something to be desired; only a third of voters under 30 had a favorable opinion of him ahead of the 2020 election.

Issues important to many young voters have taken a back seat and our political class continues to age. As a result, over the past few years there has been a fascinating depolarization along generational lines. It used to be that if I knew your age, I could pretty easily make an educated guess about how you would vote. That’s less likely to be the case today, largely because younger voters have grown more disillusioned with Democrats.

What is particularly embarrassing for Democrats is that all of this is happening in a context where young Americans are increasingly speaking out about their politics. Companies are grappling with Gen Z and Millennial employees who seem more eager than ever to work for employers who align with their political and cultural worldview. I regularly hear from business leaders who know that young consumers vote with their wallets and opt for products and services that align with their values.

If young Americans are increasingly focused on the issues and want change, but aren’t voting midterm, it represents a huge missed opportunity for those who want to see greater youth participation in politics. . And in this election, it could cost the Democrats their majority.

]]>