Handmaid’s Tale author Margaret Atwood called transphobic transphobic because of gender-neutral language

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Handmaid’s Tale author Margaret Atwood is branded transphobic for sharing gender neutral language in newspapers used to replace the word “woman”

  • The 81-year-old author retweeted an article from the Toronto Star on Tuesday
  • The article was titled: “Why Can’t We Say ‘Woman’ No Longer?”
  • Atwood’s best-known book, The Handmaid’s Tale, deals with a dystopian world in which men control women’s bodies and critics have noted what they considered irony.
  • “Big fan of your fiction about the dangers of applying extremely rigid bio-essentialist ideas to gender elsewhere,” one person tweeted.
  • The controversy echoed the engulfing one of JK Rowling, who in June 2020 mocked the use of the phrase “give birth” instead of women










Canadian author Margaret Atwood has been branded transphobic for sharing an article on Twitter complaining of neutral language.

Atwood, author of The Handmaid’s Tail, shared a Toronto Star op-ed on Tuesday titled, “Why Can’t We Say ‘Woman’ No Longer?”

Columnist Rosie DiManno, argued that adopting non-sexist language creates an “erasure of women,” which leaves “well-meaning people speechless, lest they be attacked as transphobic or otherwise unresponsive. increasingly complex constructions of the genre ”.

DiManno claimed that “woman” was “in danger of becoming a dirty word.”

She said the word risked being “taken out of the lexicon of administration, eradicated from medical vocabulary and struck out of conversation.”

The 81-year-old shared it without comment, but the article sparked an immediate reaction.

Margaret Atwood, pictured on October 6 receiving the Lattes Grinzane Special Prize in Alba, Italy, sparked controversy on Tuesday with a tweet sharing a post on gender identity

Atwood shared a post from columnist Rosie DiManno, prompting a furious response

Atwood shared a post from columnist Rosie DiManno, prompting a furious response

Cosmologist Katie Mack replied, “No one forbids the word ‘woman’.

“Many organizations – and rightly so – take precise language when talking about things related to biological traits rather than gender identity.

“It is not an attack on femininity NOT to equate gender with a specific biology.”

His tweet has been “liked” over 11,000 times.

Another person referred to Atwood’s most famous work, Booker Prize-winning Handmaid’s Tale, published in 1985. In the dystopian book, a group of women are reduced to reproductive machines, controlled by men. .

In response to Atwood asking why the word woman can no longer be used, he replied, “Good news, we still can! big fan of your fiction about the dangers of applying extremely rigid bio-essentialist ideas to gender elsewhere. ‘

Critics of Atwood have pointed out that his Booker Prize-winning novel The Handmaid's Tale explores a male-controlled society where your gender dictates your entire life.

Critics of Atwood have pointed out that his Booker Prize-winning novel The Handmaid’s Tale explores a male-controlled society where your gender dictates your entire life.

Journalist Amanda Jette Knox told her 69,000 subscribers: “I’m disappointed you shared this because it’s factually wrong.

“We can always say ‘woman’ and we can also say ‘people’ when it makes sense to use more inclusive language.

‘I’m not binary. I also have my period and have given birth to 3 children. Saying “menstruating” includes women AND me. ”

Another author, Abbie Karlish, said: “You can say woman or women or ladies or girls when and how you like.

“We also recognize that when we discuss reproductive rights, biology and a lot of other things, saying ‘women’ is often inaccurate or downright exclusive.”

Environmentalist Karen James said: “This is * exactly * how many men reacted when feminists used to advocate for gender inclusive language like ‘congressman’ or ‘he or she’. “.”

Another added: “What ??? You can say female AND you can also say trans male and non-binary person, or if you want to include it all in one word you can say pregnant person.

“Including more people doesn’t remove anyone. ”

The row echoed the one that engulfed JK Rowling in June 2020.

The Harry Potter author responded to a headline of an online article about ‘period people’ by writing in a tweet, ‘I’m sure there was a word for these people. Someone is helping me. Wumben? Wimpund? Woomud? ‘

Critics accused her of being transphobic, but Rowling said she stuck to her comments, saying it “isn’t hateful to tell the truth.”

She has been criticized by some of the film’s biggest stars, including Daniel Radcliffe, Eddie Redmayne and Emma Watson.


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